Disability Sunday resources

Rosalie Sugrue has provided some more resources for Disability Sunday, comprised of poems, prayers, and a children’s story written by her self and and another Kiwi writer, Trish Harris, and included in a new book issued last year entitled A Child Laughs: Prayers for Peace and Justice.

Unfortunately we cannot include all the material here, but we can provide you with a pdf here. 

disability

A personal prayer/poem

THE CARRIER AND THE CARRIED

I don’t notice your disability anymore. …. It’s

just something you carry with you, she said.
….
I carry it with me
like a handbag
swinging loosely by my side
        pick it up
        put it down.
A handbag
I never lose
and never replace.

I carry it on me
like a cotton shirt
on a summers day.
Wind easing its finger
between skin and fabric
billowing it out
pulling it too
playing at separation
but the buttons hold tight.

I carry it in me
channels
carved deep
by a river
always in flood.

I carry it through me
like the weight
of a name
for a child never born.
A presence
and an absence.

I carry it  with me
        on me
        in me
and through me.

I am the carrier

and I am also
the carried.

A blue tear
filled with gold.

 

Public Prayers   (Approach)

Loving God,
We acknowledge that regardless of health,
attitude, appearance or status,
we are people marred by imperfections.
Grant us the strength to manage our infirmities
with wise caring, good humour, and gratitude.
Help us use whatever we have to become
more insightful to the conditions of humans,
and more attentive to matters spiritual.
Save us from falling victim to self-centredness
         – a malaise that preys on the fit and the unfit
that left unchecked is more soul destroying
and more binding than any physical aberration.
In the loving of others may we find perfection.  Amen.

 

A story for children of all ages

The Tiny Town of Tontevoc

The tiny town of Tontevoc nestled in a sunny valley beside a sparkling river.  It was surrounded by green fields backed by snow capped mountains.  Everyone lived in a warm house and no one went short of anything they needed.  Instead of enjoying the good things they had the children of Tontevoc School were discontent.  Each child thought some other child was more fortunate.

One child owned a pony and another had a magnificent tree house.  There was a girl who could run like the wind.  Her brother could sing like angel.  Their cousins were exceptional at tennis.  There were twins who looked alike and often argued.  A boy who painted beautiful pictures lived with his grandmother.  The family of four played boisterous games and got to sleep in bunks.  The cleverest girl in the school wore thick glasses.  Her sister was very pretty.  One child lived in a grand house and had many toys.  And, there was a boy who limped and had to use a crutch.

One day the Wise-woman of Tontevoc visited the school holding a bunch of floating balloons.  … [See page 4 of the pdf file for more …]

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Poem and article relating to Matthew 5:38-48

Linda Cowan writes:

This poem fits with Sunday’s reading from Matthew 5: 38–48  – and also Kathleen Rushton’s article in the latest Tui Motu [“Give your cloak as well,” no. 212, February 2017, p. 22-23] which is really good!

Revolution

The enemy:
            love them
The oppressor:
            walk the mile with them
The Master:
            turn the other cheek to them

This doormat faith
seems too much to bear
in a world where those who bully
always seem to win

The enemy:
            imbalance them with love
The oppressor:
            shame the law that oppresses
The Master:
           turn the cheek as an equal

This rebellious faith
seems too much to bear
in a world where those who bully
are loved back to justice by the bullied

But this is heaven’s revolution
and we are called into it
come let us worship
love’s rebel, Jesus

~ written by Roddy Hamilton, and posted on Mucky Paws.