Palm Sunday Prayer of Confession

Palm Sunday Prayer of Confession

donkeyJesus riding on a donkey
We hail you as our king.
Your way is our way,
You are the man for us –

Or at least you are the man for us
until your way becomes too hard.
When it starts to leave us isolated,
when it costs us money or sleep,
when it all gets too tough
then we put down our palm branches
and join the other crowd,
the ones who cry “Crucify”.

Lord, forgive us because we are so fickle.
When we make the commitment to walk in your way,
when we acknowledge you as King of our lives,
help us to do this knowing that the way may not be easy
but that you will strengthen us for the road ahead.
Help us to know that after crucifixion comes resurrection
and this is the way we walk with you.

Jesus riding on a donkey
we hail you as our King.
Your way is our way – whatever the cost
because we know we walk with you.
AMEN

© Linda Cowan

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Palm Sunday – Opening Prayer

palm sunday 02

Palm Sunday: Opening Prayer

Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout, daughter of Jerusalem!
See, your king comes to you; righteous and having salvation, gentle and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.
(Zechariah 9:9)

As the people spread their coats palm branches on the ground to welcome Jesus into Jerusalem, so we welcome him into our lives this morning. King of Glory, King of Peace, Servant King, reign in our hearts and lives this day and all days, that we might praise your holy name.

Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.
ALL: Hosanna in the highest

From http://www.faithandworship.com/liturgy_Palm_Sunday.htm#ixzz1mVljBQRp

Proclaim Him King, by Joy Kingsbury-Aitken

Proclaim Him King

by Joy Kingsbury-Aiken

[A full script, in pdf, for this Palm/Passion Sunday drama can be obtained here.]

Dramatis Personae

Shelah (owner of the donkey)
Peleg (owner of the oil press at Gethsemane)
Messenger (servant of Simon the Leper)Martha of Bethany
Mary of Bethany
Simon the Leper
Simon Peter (disciple)
James son of Zebedee (disciple)
John son of Zebedee (disciple)
Judas Iscariot (disciple)
palm sundayThomas (disciple)
Jesus of Nazareth
Lazarus of Bethany
Andrew (disciple)
Philip (disciple)
The Crowd
Pharisees
Narrator

Scene One
The Village of Bethphage. Two men (Shelah and Peleg) are admiring the new donkey that Shelah and his family have just acquired.

Peleg: He’s a nice looking donkey, Shelah. He’ll serve you and your family well for many years to come.

Shelah: I hope so. I had to pay a substantial part of last year’s harvest for him. He’s a young one, never ridden, but seems to have a placid temperament.

A messenger approaches the men.

Messenger: I’m looking for Peleg the owner of the oil press in Gethsemane. I was told he was visiting his friend Shelah in Bethphage. Do you know where I might find him?

Peleg: I’m Peleg, and this is Shelah my friend. What do you want with me?

Messenger: I have an invitation to a dinner party for you, and for your friend too.

Peleg: Who is having a dinner party?

Messenger: Lazarus of Bethany and his family. The prophet from Galilee and his disciples will be there. Lazarus wants all his friends to meet Jesus.  ….

~~~~~~

A full script, in pdf, for the Palm/Passion Sunday drama can be obtained here.

Palm Sunday resources – by Rosalie Sugrue

Call to worship:

The festival of Palm Sunday is a Christian custom,
a custom that extends back almost to the year dot.
Each succeeding year the faithful give voice to hope,
not just in devout song, but in cheers of acclamation.
Waving greenery wafts whispers of liberation,

– whispers that rise to crescendos of joy,

On reflection the commemoration is peculiar …
Because we know what that first crowd didn’t know,
We know how the journey ended …
So why add our hosannas to theirs?

Is it because a divine spark resides in all humans
A spark that calls us to rejoice in the journey
A spark that says no matter how it ends
Life is more about the journey than the destination.

What can be celebrated should be celebrated, for
Hope springs eternal and death does not defeat Joy.

 

Benediction/Commission:

We go from this service
mindful of calendar-changing
events of 2,000 years ago.
We go into a world of problems,
Problems so vast we feel helpless;
Yet as individuals we make choices –

small choices;
But even small choices
make a small difference;
Collectively the difference could be great.

Help us make the right choices,
So we may live as you
would have us live.

 

See also – Palm Sunday – Customs and Traditions (compiled by RMS)

 

 

Caleb’s Donkey – by Joy Kingsbury-Aitken

Caleb’s Donkey

by Joy Kingsbury-Aitken

A Children’s Story for Palm Sunday

In a small village like Bethphage the purchase of a donkey was a big event.  Each harvest season old Caleb had gathered in the nuts from the almond tree that grew beside the doorway of his one room dwelling.   For almost a decade he had put a few of the coins earned from the sale of these almonds into a clay money jar, which he had kept hidden out of sight of nosey tax collectors and inquisitive neighbours, until he had enough donkeymoney saved to buy a donkey.  His purchase was a young animal, a colt only just independent of its mother.  The donkey appeared to have a placid temperament, seemingly unconcerned by all the attention it was generating.   The village children in particular were excited by the donkey’s arrival in their midst.  They chattered noisily as they gathered around the creature, patting its back, scratching behind its ears, and poking handfuls of grass towards it, which the donkey obligingly munched upon.   Their excitement was mirrored by old Caleb’s, although he didn’t show it so audibly.  At long last he would not need to struggle up the hillside, bent double by the weight of the bundle of willow sticks gathered from the valley floor, which he needed to carry up to Bethphage to fuel his cooking fire.  In fact the donkey would be able to carry many more sticks than he could manage, so he would not need to go down into the valley and climb back up to his home so often.  Then when the olives were harvested, he would not have to shoulder the baskets of ripe fruit to take to the oil press at Gethsemane, nor personally carry the jars of oil to the market place from there.  The donkey was going to make a huge difference in his life.  Living was going to become so much easier.

Read more …